CONTENT
  1. Basic Meanings of Faire
  2. Conjugation
  3. Faire as "To Be"
  4. Faire with Sports
  5. Se Faire in Grammatical Constructions
  6. Faire in Idiomatic Expressions

Faire is another common verb that can be very tricky. Let's see how it is used and conjugated.

Native

Translation

Je fais un gâteau.

I'm making a cake.

Basic Meanings of Faire

Rule 1: Faire can be translated as "to do" or "to make." Yes, unlike in English, you don't have to use different verbs to indicate one of these two meanings.

Native

Translation

Je fais le lit.

I make the bed.

Je fais la vaisselle.

I do the dishes.

Exception: Faire is not used in constructions such as "to make some sad."

Native

Translation

Tu me rends triste.

You make me sad.

Conjugation

Rule 2: Faire is yet another basic verb that is irregular.

je fais
tu fais
il, elle, on fait
nous faisons
vous faites
ils, elles font

Faire as "To Be"

Rule 3: This verb can also be used as "to be" in two situations: when it comes to weather and math.

Native

Translation

Il fait froid.

It's cold.

Deux fois deux font quatre.

Two times two is four.

Faire with Sports

Rule 4: Faire is also used in constructions similar to the English "to do sport."

Native

Translation

Je fais du vélo.

I bike.

Se Faire in Grammatical Constructions

Rule 5: Faire is used along with the infinitive and the reflexive pronoun "se" in the causative constructions ("to have something done").

Native

Translation

Elle s'est fait coiffer.

She had her hair done.

Faire in Idiomatic Expressions

Rule 6: This verb is found in many idiomatic expressions, for example:

Native

Translation

Ça ne fait rien.

It doesn't matter.

Faire de son mieux.

To do one's best.

Quiz

1/4

Elle _ la vaisselle.

0

correct answers.